SqlJuxt – Building primary keys on a table

There were a few interesting design decisions I had to make when designing the code to script a primary key on a table. Before I dive into them I think it is good to see the finished code, here is a test that uses the TableBuilder to create a clustered primary key on a table:

[<Fact>]
let ``should be able to build a table with a clustered primary key on a mulitple columns``() =
    CreateTable "RandomTableName"
        |> WithInt "MyKeyColumn"
        |> WithInt "SecondKeyColumn"
        |> WithVarchar "ThirdCol" 50
        |> WithVarchar "ForthCol" 10
        |> WithClusteredPrimaryKey [("MyKeyColumn", ASC); ("SecondKeyColumn", DESC); ("ThirdCol", DESC)]
        |> Build
        |> should equal @"CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RandomTableName]( [MyKeyColumn] [int] NOT NULL, [SecondKeyColumn] [int] NOT NULL, [ThirdCol] [varchar](50) NOT NULL, [ForthCol] [varchar](10) NOT NULL )
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[RandomTableName] ADD CONSTRAINT [PK_RandomTableName] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([MyKeyColumn] ASC, [SecondKeyColumn] DESC, [ThirdCol] DESC)
GO"

What I like about this code is that just from reading it, it is obvious what the code will do. It will create a create table script with 4 columns with a clustered primary key on 3 of those cloumns.

I decided to go with the approach to take the minimal amount of arguments possible in order to define the primary key. Those being the list of column names and sort order of the columns that you want as a primary key. Originally I thought about allowing the user to specify the primary key name but actually this just adds noise to the code. One can be generated using the convention “PK_” + tableName. Also why make the user think about the name for the primary key when all we really care about is that there is a primary key there and that it has a unique name.

I love the way that in f# you can use discriminate unions to represent states to make the code easy to read and work with. In the above example I could have taken many approaches to specify the column sort order such as using a bool to say whether or not the column is ascending. However, if I had gone with that approach then when calling the code you would have ended up with “columnName true” or “columnName false”. This already feels horrible as just from reading the code you do not know what the true or false means. By defining a discriminate union of ASC/DESC you can immediately tell what the parameter is and what it is doing.

The primary key is defined as a constraint as the following type:

type Constraint = {name: string; columns: (Column * SortDirection)  list; isClustered: bool}

Then the table type has been extended to add a Constraint as a primary key using the option type. As a table may or may not have a primary key. It is nice that we can use Option to represent this rather than having to rely on null like we would in an imperative language.

The hardest part to making this work is taking the list of (String * SortDirection) that the WithClusteredPrimaryKey function takes and turning that in to a list of (Column * SortDirection). This is done using the following function:

let private getColumnsByNames (columnNames: (string * SortDirection) list) table =
            columnNames |> List.map(fun (c,d) -> let column = table.columns |> List.tryFind(fun col ->  match col with
                                                                                            | IntColumn i when i.name = c -> true
                                                                                            | VarColumn v when v.name = c -> true
                                                                                            | _ -> false)
                                                 match column with
                                                    | Some col -> (col, d)
                                                    | None -> failwithf "no column named %s exists on table %s" c table.name )

It is great in F# how we can let the types guide us. If you look at the signature of the function above then we can see that it is:

getColumnsByNames (columnNames: (string * SortDirection) list) -> (table:Table) -> (Column * SortDirection) list

When you look at the types you can see that there are not too many ways this function could be implemented. Using what is in the room as Erik Meijer would say we go through the columns on the table and match them up with the column names that were passed in (throwing an exception if a name is passed in that is not on the table) and then return the actual column along with the sort direction.

F# is proving to be an interesting choice in writing the database comparison library. It is a totally different way of thinking but I feel that I’m starting to come to terms with thinking functionally.

If you want to check out the full source code and delve deeper feel free to check out the SqlJuxt GitHub repository.

One thought on “SqlJuxt – Building primary keys on a table

  1. Pingback: F# Weekly #3, 2017 – Sergey Tihon's Blog

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