BuilderFramework – a framework for committing and rolling back test setup

In a recent piece of work the need has come up again to write some builder code for use with tests.  I feel passionately that you should take as much care with your test code as you do with your main software code that goes out of the door.  The reason for this is that your tests are your specification.  They prove the software does what it says it is going to do.  Having well written, clean and repeatable tests is vital.  Tests that are hard to maintain and brittle get ignored when they aren’t working.  Unfortunately you hear phrases like “Oh don’t worry about that test it’s always broken” all too often.

Part of the reason that a lot of tests I see out in the real world aren’t repeatable is that they rely on 3rd party systems that they can’t control very easily.  The biggest one of these is a database.  I’ve seen acceptance tests relying on a certain set of products having certain attributes in a database.  It’s not hard to see why this isn’t a great idea.  As products change in the database the tests start breaking.

To fix this problem a nice approach is to use the builder pattern to build setup your data in a certain way, run your test and then roll the data back to how it was before.  This is something that I have written various times so I’ve decided to start an open source project on github.  The product will provide the boiler plate code so you can just concentrate on writing the steps.

The project will have an interface that you have to implement that looks like this:

public interface IBuildStep
{
    void Commit();
    void Rollback();
}

It doesn’t get any more straight forward than that. Once you have written a build step you will be able to add it to the main builder in 2 ways. The first way is you can just pass in an instance:

var builder = new Builder()
                    .With(new MyStep());

The second way is that you can provide a type that can build your step. This allows you to write a builder that can build up a class using a fluent interface and just plug it in. For example if I had a builder:

public class MyStepBuilder
{
    private MyStep _myStep;

    public MyStepBuilder()
    {
        _myStep = new MyStep();
    }
    
    public MyStepBuilder WithValue(int value);
    {
       _myStep.Value = value;
    }
    // more methods here to setp all of the properties on _myStep
    // ...

    public MyStep Build()
    {
       return _myStep;
    }
}

Then you would be able to plug that builder into the main builder giving you a fluent interface:

    var builder = new Builder()
                        .With<MyStepBuilder>(s => s.WithValue(3)
                                                   .Build());

Either way once you have an instance of the builder you can then commit your steps by calling commit and then roll them back by calling rollback.

Keep an eye on the github project to see how this developed. If you like the idea or have any thoughts about how it can be improved please give me a shout.

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